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Dr. Tobias Endler

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tendler@hca.uni-heidelberg.de

 
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Visiting Scholars

Turner _john

Prof. Dr. John Turner

HCA Scholar-in-Residence
jturner@hca.uni-heidelberg.de

John Turner teaches and writes about the history of religion in nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. He is the author of Brigham Young: Pioneer Prophet (Harvard University Press, 2012) and Bill Bright and Campus Crusade for Christ: The Renewal of Evangelicalism in Postwar America (University of North Carolina Press, 2008), and winner of Christianity Today's 2009 award for History/Biography. He blogs for Religion in American History and The Anxious Bench, and has written for popular outlets such as the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, and the Los Angeles Times.

Wilson _mark

Prof. Dr. Mark Wilson

International Visiting Professor
mwilson@hca.uni-heidelberg.de

Mark R. Wilson is visiting the HCA from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte where he is an associate professor of history. He received his Ph.D. in 2002 from the University of Chicago. Professor Wilson specializes in the history of U.S. military-industrial relations. In 2004-05, he held a postdoctoral fellowship at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University. His first book, The Business of Civil War, was published in 2006 by Johns Hopkins University Press. In 2012-13, he held a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Wilson is presently serving as a trustee of the Business History Conference, and he is completing his second book about the business and politics of U.S. industrial mobilization for World War II.

Komline _david

David Komline

Fulbright Fellow

David Komline, a doctoral candidate in history at the University of Notre Dame, is spending the 2013-2014 academic year at the Heidelberg Center for American Studies on a Fulbright Fellowship. He is currently working on his dissertation, "The Common School Awakening: Education, Religion, and Reform in Transatlantic Perspective, 1800-1848." His research for this project, which draws upon archival sources in France, Germany and the United States, has been supported by grants from the Virginia Historical Society, the American Congregational Association in conjunction with the Boston Athenaeum, and several institutes at the University of Notre Dame. Before beginning his doctoral program he spent a year at the University of Tübingen on a grant from the DAAD. He also holds a Master of Divinity degree from Princeton Theological Seminary and a BA from Wheaton College, IL.

Prof. Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham

James W.C. Pennington Distinguished Fellow 2013
ebhiggin@fas.harvard.edu

Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham is the Victor S. Thomas Professor of History and of African and African American Studies at Harvard University and the second recipient of the James W.C. Pennington Distinguished Fellowship.  Professor Higginbotham earned a Ph.D. from the University of Rochester in American History, an M.A. from Howard University, and her B.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.  Before coming to Harvard, she taught on the full-time faculties of Dartmouth, the University of Maryland, and the University of Pennsylvania.  In addition, she has served as a Visiting Professor at Princeton University, New York University, and Duke University. She also holds an honorary degree from Howard University. Her writings span diverse fields—African American religious history, women's history, civil rights, constructions of racial and gender identity, electoral politics, and the intersection of theory and history.  Professor Higginbotham has thoroughly revised and re-written the classic African American history survey From Slavery to Freedom.  She is the co-author with the late John Hope Franklin of this book’s ninth edition (2010) and co-editor with Henry Louis Gates, Jr., of the African American National Biography (2008), and its forerunner, African American Lives (2004). Professor Higginbotham was the editor-in-chief of The Harvard Guide to African-American History (2001) with general editors Darlene Clark Hine, and Leon Litwack. In addition, Professor Higginbotham is the author of Righteous Discontent: The Women's Movement in the Black Baptist Church: 1880-1920 (1993), which won numerous book prizes, and was also included among the New York Times Book Review’s Notable Books of the Year in 1993 and 1994. Her current project is a book on African-Americans and Human Rights.

Prof. Saje Mathieu, Ph.D. Portrait Mathieu

Ghaemian Scholar-in-Residence
smathieu@hca.uni-heidelberg.de

Sarah-Jane (Saje) Mathieu, an Associate Professor of History at the University of Minnesota, is the 2012-2013 Ghaemian Scholar-in-Residence. Prof. Mathieu earned a joint Ph.D. in History and African American Studies from Yale University and specializes in twentieth century American and African American history with an emphasis on immigration, war, race, globalization, social movements, and political resistance. Her first book North of the Color Line: Migration and Black Resistance in Canada, 1870-1955 examines the social and political impact of African American and West Indian sleeping car porters in Canada. She is currently working on her next book, 1919: Race, Riot, and Revolution, a global study of race riots in the post Great War era. This new project investigates how black intellectual-activists galvanized new transnational models of political resistance in response to international outbreaks of racialized violence. Prof. Dr. Mathieu has earned several international awards and is a former fellow at the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and at Harvard University’s W. E. B. Du Bois Institute. She is also the recipient of the University of Minnesota’s Arthur ‘Red’ Motley Exemplary Teaching Award.

Prof. Charles PostelPostel

Ghaemian Scholar-in-Residence
cpostel@hca.uni-heidelberg.de

The Ghaemian Scholar-in-Residence 2011-2012, Charles Postel is an associate professor of history at San Francisco State University. He has also taught at California State University, Sacramento, and at the University of California, Berkeley. Charles Postel earned both his B.A. in history (1995) and his Ph.D. in history (2002) from the University of California, Berkeley. An award winning historian of American political thought and society, he is the author of The Populist Vision (2007), a history of the original Populist movement of the 1890s, which received the Bancroft Prize in History and the Frederick Jackson Turner Award from the Organization of American Historians, two of the most prestigious prizes in the historical profession. His new book project is Pursuit of Reform, 1865-1920, a new interpretative work on the post-Civil War reform movements that culminated in the Progressive Era. Charles Postel is also researching the historical origins of the Tea Party movement.

Prof. Kirsten FischerKirsten Fischer 2011 Web

Fulbright Fellow
kfischer@hca.uni-heidelberg.de

Kirsten Fischer received her MA and Ph.D. in history from Duke University in North Carolina. After six years at the University of South Florida in Tampa, she moved to the University of Minnesota where is is now a tenured associate professor of early American history. Her first book, Suspect Relations: Sex, Race, and Resistance in Colonial North Carolina (Cornell, 2002), shows how ordinary people, through their everyday interactions, participated in the construction of racialized thought in this developing slave society. Fischer also co-edited Colonial American History, a collection of scholarly essays and primary sources (Blackwell, 2002). Fischer's current research interests pertain to American religious history and especially the presence of freethought in the early Republic. She is writing a book about Elihu Palmer (1764-1806), an ardent advocate in New York of the most radical ideas coming out of the European Enlightenment. Fischer conceived this project when she was the Deutsche Bank Junior Fellow at the HCA in 2008-2009. That same year she returned as a Fulbright fellow, and taught a BAS course on "America in a Revolutionary Age." Fischer enjoys teaching, and in 2011 she received an award from the University of Minnesota for outstanding contributions to undergraduate education.

Prof. Albert J. RaboteauPortrait Raboteau

James W.C. Pennington Distinguished Fellow
raboteau@princeton.edu

Albert J. Raboteau is one of the foremost authorities on African-American religious history in the United States. He is the Henry W. Putnam Professor of Religion at Princeton University and was the first recipient of the James W.C. Pennington Award, a prize given by the HCA and Heidelberg University's Faculty of Theology to scholars who have done distinguished work on the African American experience in the Atlantic world. Prof. Raboteau has written the seminal book on Christianity among American slaves, Slave Religion: The 'Invisible Institution' in the Antebellum South. He is also the author of A Fire in the Bones: Reflections on African-American Religious History and of Canaan Land: A Religious History of African Americans as well as co-editor of African-American Religion: Interpretive Essays in History and Culture. His current work is on religion and literature.

Prof. Kenneth P. MinkemaPortrait Minkema

Visiting Professor
kenneth.minkema@yale.edu

Kenneth P. Minkema is the Executive Editor of The Works of Jonathan Edwards and of the Jonathan Edwards Center & Online Archive at Yale University. He has a dual appointment, serving as Research Faculty at Yale Divinity School and as Research Associate at the University of the Free State, South Africa. He has a B.A. from Calvin College, an M.A. from Bowling Green State University, and a Ph.D from the University of Connecticut. Prof. Minekma is a leading expert on Jonathan Edwards, who is widely considered the most significant figure in early American theology. He has published numerous articles on Jonathan Edwards and topics in early American religious history in professional journals including The Journal of American History, The William and Mary Quarterly, The New England Quarterly, Church History and The Massachusetts Historical Review; he has edited volume 14 in the Edwards Works, Sermons and Discourses: 1723-1729 and co-edited A Jonathan Edwards Reader; The Sermons of Jonathan Edwards: A Reader; Jonathan Edwards at 300: Essays on the Tercentennial of His Birth; and Jonathan Edwards’s “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”: A Casebook. He has also co-edited The Sermon Notebook of Samuel Parris, 1689-1694, dealing with the Salem Witchcraft crisis, and The Colonial Church Records of Reading and Rumney Marsh, Massachusetts. Finally, Prof. Minkema is currently part of a team being co-led by the HCA's Jan Stievermann, preparing Cotton Mather’s Biblia Americana, the first Bible commentary written in the New World, for publication.

Prof. Rachel M. WheelerPortrait Wheeler

Fulbright Senior Lecturer
wheelerr@iupui.edu

Rachel M. Wheeler, a 2011/2012 Fulbright Scholar, is associate professor of religious studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and associate editor of the journal Religion and American Culture. She earned her M.A. and Ph.D from Yale University. Prof. Wheeler is a leading expert on Christian missions to Native Americans, having authored a critical book on the subject, To Live upon Hope: Missions and the Formation of Mahican Identity in the Eighteenth-Century Northeast, which traces one Mahican Christian family from its pre-conversion days in 1740s Massachusetts to its annihilation in Indiana in 1815. Additionally, she has written over thirty articles, essays, and papers on the subject, and recently co-authoring a new textbook on American religious history for Cambridge University Press.

Photo: Courtesy of Indiana University

Patrick Roberts, PhDRoberts Headsht

Ghaemian Scholar-in-Residence
robertsp@vt.edu

Patrick S. Roberts is an assistant professor with the Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP) in the School of Public and International Affairs at Virginia Tech University. He holds a Ph.D. in Government from the University of Virginia, an M.A. in political philosophy from Claremont Graduate University, and a B.A. from the University of Dallas. Patrick has been a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University and at the Program on Constitutional Government at Harvard University. He has published in a variety of scholarly and popular journals, and his research has been funded by United States government agencies and the Social Science Research Council. His current project is a book manuscript titled Disasters and the Democratic State: How Bureaucrats, Politicians, and the Public Prepare for the Unexpected.

Rashida Braggs, PhDRbraggs

Ghaemian Scholar-in-Residence
rbraggs@stanford.edu

Rashida K. Braggs received a Ph.D. in Performance Studies at Northwestern University; she was also awarded an M.S. in Mass Communications from Boston University and a B.A. in English and Theater Studies from Yale University.  Braggs recently served as a postdoctoral fellow in the Introduction to Humanities Program at Stanford University, where she taught in conjunction with Drama, American Studies, and African American Studies. In her book project, Before Jazz Was American: Exploring the Changing Identity of Jazz in Post-WWII Paris, she problematizes the idea that jazz is uniquely American by investigating collaborations between African American musicians and their French counterparts in postwar France. Braggs has published in Nottingham French Studies and The Journal of Popular Music Studies. Her scholastic interests have strongly influenced her extracurricular activities, as she has performed in poetry slams and jazz jam sessions.

Prof. William GrangeGrange

wgrange@unl.edu

William Grange is Hixson-Lied Professor of Theatre Arts in the Johnny Carson School of Theatre and Film at the University of Nebraska. The author of eight books currently in print, he has also written several scholarly essays, book chapters, journal articles, reviews, and encyclopedia entries. In 2007 he was named Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Humanities and Cultural Studies at the University of Vienna, where he taught in German, concentrating on American actors, actresses, and American theatre history. He has also taught in German at the University of Cologne, under the auspices of the German Fulbright Commission and the University of Cologne Senate. Prof. Grange has also received numerous awards for his research and scholarship from the German Academic Exchange Service in Bonn, Germany; the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas; the National Endowment for the Humanities in Washington, D.C.; the Dorot Foundation in Providence, Rhode Island; the Mellon Foundation in New York City, the International Institute of Education, the Hixson-Lied Trust Endowment, the Jane Harrison Lyman Research Trust Fund, and several others. He has received the University of Nebraska Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Research in the Humanities and most recently a DAAD Guest Professorship at the University of Heidelberg, teaching in the Heidelberg Center for American Studies.

Prof. Jeremi SuriSuri

suri@wisc.edu
http://jeremisuri.net

Jeremi Suri is the E. Gordon Fox Professor of History, the Director of the European Union Center of Excellence, and the Director of the Grand Strategy Program at the University of Wisconsin. He is the author of Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Détente (Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2003). More recent book publications include The Global Revolutions of 1968 (New York: W.W. Norton, 2007), and Henry Kissinger and the American Century (Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2007). His research and teaching have received numerous prizes. In 2007 Smithsonian Magazine named Professor Suri one of America's "Top Young Innovators" in the Arts and Sciences. His writings appear widely in blogs and print media. Professor Suri is also a frequent public lecturer and guest on radio and television programs.

Prof. Robert Cherny Bob Apr 3 09 _v2.jpg

Fulbright Visiting Professor
cherny@sfsu.edu

Professor Robert Cherny has served on the history faculty of San Francisco State University since 1971. His courses deal with the U.S. between 1865 and 1945, politics, and California and the West. His Ph.D. is from Columbia University. Cherny is author of three books on the history of U.S. politics, 1865-1925, co-author of two books on the history of San Francisco, co-author of college textbooks on American history and California history, co-editor of an anthology on the Cold War and labor and of a special issue of the Pacific Historical Review on woman suffrage around the Pacific Rim, and co-editor of an anthology in progress on California women and politics, 1865-1930. Most of his two dozen essays in journals and anthologies are on western politics and labor. He has been a fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Distinguished Fulbright lecturer at Moscow State University, and visiting scholar at the University of Melbourne. He has been president of H-Net and the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, member of the executive board of the Organization of American Historians, and member of the editorial boards of the Pacific Historical Review and California History.

Prof. Jeannette Eileen JonesJjones

Deutsche Bank Junior Scholar-in-Residence
jjones11@unlnotes.unl.edu

Jeannette Eileen Jones is a native New Yorker, who received her B.A. in History, with minors in Philosophy and Political Science from Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. She earned her Master’s and Doctoral degrees in History from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She joined the UNL faculty in 2004 and is currently Assistant Professor of History and Ethnic Studies (African American and African Studies). Her teaching specializations are in African American history and studies and the history of pre-colonial Africa. Her research focuses on American and transatlantic cultural and intellectual history, with emphases on race and representation in science, film, and popular culture.

New Publication: In Search of Brightest Africa – Reimagining the Dark Continent in American Culture, 1884–1936  (The University of Georgia Press, 2010)

Prof. Elizabeth BorgwardtBorgwardt

Fulbright Visiting Professor
eborgwar@artsci.wustl.edu

Elizabeth Borgwardt studied history and law and earned her B.A. and M.Phil. in international relations at Cambridge University. She also received a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a Ph.D. from Stanford University. Her permanent position is in the Department of History at Washington University in St. Louis, where she is associate professor of international history. She specializes in the history of the United States’ role in world affairs, historical perspectives on human rights, and the history of international law and institutions. Her first book, A New Deal for the World: America’s Vision for Human Rights, published by Harvard University Press in 2005, analyzes how planning for postwar international institutions transformed the idea of human rights in wartime American political thought. It has garnered several prizes. Currently, she is working on a second book project tentatively titled “Nuremberg: The Trial of the Century in History and Memory.”

Photo: Courtesy of Washington University St. Louis

Prof. Cesar N. CaviedesCaviedes

Alexander von Humboldt Fellow
caviedes@geog.ufl.edu

Cesar N. Caviedes studied and taught at the Catholic University of Valparaiso in his home country of Chile. After further studies at the University of Florence in Italy, he began his doctoral studies in 1969 at the University of Freiburg. His international resume continued at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and at the University of Saskatchewan-Regina. In 1980, he became the chair for Latin American geography at the University of Florida. Caviedes has received awards from the Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung, the Canada Council for the Humanities, and the National Science Foundation. In 1996, the Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers awarded Caviedes with the “Distinguished Latin Americanist Career Award”. Caviedes has written eight books on Latin America, geopolitics, geography, and El Niño as well as numerous articles on these and other subjects. He is a member in the editorial boards of various journals and periodicals in the USA, Europe, and Latin America. http://plaza.ufl.edu/caviedes/

Lehne _richard

Prof. Richard Lehne

Fulbright Visiting Professor
lehne@rci.rutgers.edu

Professor Richard Lehne received his B.A. from Reed College and his Ph.D. from the Maxwell School, Syracuse University. He has taught previously at St. Lawrence University and was Gastprofessor at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt/Main in the spring-summer semester 1993. Currently, he is teaching at Rutgers University, New Jersey. His primary field of interest is the interaction between the political process and industrial decision making, focusing on advanced industrial nations, especially Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. His approach is presented in Industry and Politics: United States in Comparative Perspective (Prentice Hall, 1993). His current work examines the governmental decision process for programs to promote commercial technologies, and he has recently completed review essays in this area for the American Political Science Review and the Policy Studies Review. His earlier work concentrated on New Jersey policy issues and resulted in the publication of The Quest for Justice: The Politics of School Finance Reform (Longman, 1978); Casino Policy: an analysis of industry regulation (Rutgers University Press, 1986); Politics in New Jersey, co-editor and contributor, revised edition, (Rutgers, 1979); as well as numerous other articles and reports. http://www.polisci.rutgers.edu/

Prof. William Funk Billfunk.019.jpg

Fulbright Senior Scholar
funk@lclark.edu

Professor Funk studied at Harvard and Columbia universities and practiced law in the U.S. Department of Justice, in the U.S. Department of Energy, and on the Legislation Subcommittee of the Intelligence Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. For the past 20 years, he has taught constitutional law, administrative law, and environmental law at Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon. He is the author of several books and numerous articles, primarily concerning administrative law, and has served as the Chair of the Administrative Law Sections of both the American Bar Association and the Association of American Law Schools. In November 2007, William Funk has been elected a member of the prestigious American Law Institute (ALI). http://www.lclark.edu/dept/lawadmss/funk.html

 

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