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Ph.D. in American Studies
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Contact

Dr. Tobias Endler

T: +49 (0)6221 / 54 3878
F: +49 (0)6221 / 54 3719

tendler@hca.uni-heidelberg.de

Office Hours: 
Thu, 9.30-11 AM

 
News

Publications

Cover Santoro Exilde Anthony Santoro, Exile and Embrace (2013)

Axel Kaiser, Interventionism and Misery: 1929-2008 (2012)

 
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Faculty

Baker

Millie Baker

Presentation and Media Skills

milliebaker@web.de
+49 (0)6221-54 37 10

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Millie Baker studied English and German philology and received her Master of Arts degree from the University of Heidelberg. Originally from London, she has been working in Germany since 1999 as a trainer for academic and business English, translator, and workshop facilitator for communication skills. Millie creates and carries out interactive workshops for researchers and doctoral candidates across the disciplines, combining academic communication skills with the English language to create specialized courses in presenting, writing and networking. Millie is co-author of “Schlüsselkompetenzen Handbuch für Geistes- und Kulturwissenschaften” (Key Competencies Handbook for Humanities and Cultural Studies). Her courses are currently run at the German Cancer Research Centre, the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, and in various departments at the Universities of Berlin, Frankfurt, Konstanz, Heidelberg, and Vienna.

 

Berg

Prof. Dr. Manfred Berg

History

manfred.berg@zegk.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 6221 54 2276

History Department
Grabengasse 3-5
69117 Heidelberg

Manfred Berg is the Curt Engelhorn Professor of American History at the University of Heidelberg and a specialist in the history of the African American civil rights movement. His book “The Ticket to Freedom: The NAACP and the Struggle for Black Political Integration” was published in 2005 by the University Press of Florida. In 2006 Manfred Berg received the David Thelen Award of the Organization of American Histori¬ans for his essay “Civil Rights and Liberal Anticommunism: The NAACP during the Early Cold War,” which was published in the June 2007 issue of the Journal of American History. In addition, Professor Berg has published ten more monographs and edited volumes and over forty scholarly articles in both English and German on various aspects of American and German history. Before he was appointed professor of Ameri¬can History at Heidelberg, he taught at the Free University of Berlin and was a research fellow (1992-1997) at the German Historical Institute, Washington, D.C., among other positions. In 2009 he served as the Lewis P. Jones Professor of History at Wofford College, Spartanburg, South Carolina.

 

Endler _tobias

Dr. Tobias Endler

American Studies

tendler@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 (0)6221-54 38 78

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Tobias Endler is a Research Associate and Ph.D. & Research Coordinator at the Heidelberg Center for American Studies. He has worked on public intellectuals in present-day America, Enlightenment thinking, and issues of democracy. His current research focuses on U.S. foreign policy in the 21st century, and the future of transatlantic and transpacific relations. Endler has published two books: After 9/11: Leading Political Thinkers about the World, the U.S. and Themselves (2011), a collection of interviews with leading political thinkers such as Zbigniew Brzezinski, Noam Chomsky, Francis Fukuyama, and Anne-Marie Slaughter, and How to Be a Superpower (2012).

 

Gerhard

Prof. Dr. Ulrike Gerhard

Geography

ulrike.gerhard@geog.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 6221 / 54 5542

Geographisches Institut
Berliner Straße 48
69120 Heidelberg

Ulrike Gerhard is professor for Human Geography of North America at the Geography Department. Previously she has taught North American Studies as well as Urban Geography at the University of Wuerzburg (2001-10), Munich (2005-06) and also Heidelberg (2008-09). She has been a geography student at Marburg as well as Waterloo, Canada and received her PhD in 1998 from Marburg University, doing research on urban consumer landscapes in Canada and Germany. Since then she has studied the political geography of US American cities in the US (see for example a book titled “Global City Washington, D.C. – eine politische Stadtgeographie”), spending several months in Washington, D.C. (e.g., at the German Historical Institute) and other North American cities. Her most recent research topics deal with urban inequality in the Americas, the discursive structuring of cities as well as consumerism in North American and European cities.

 

Leypoldt

Prof. Dr. Günter Leypoldt

Literature/Cultural Studies

leypoldt@as.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 6221 54-2816

English Department
Kettengasse 12
69117 Heidelberg

Günter Leypoldt is professor of American Literature and Culture at the Faculty of Modern Languages. Previously he taught American studies at the universities of Tübingen (2001-7), Maryland, College Park (2003), and Mainz (2007-2009), with degrees in American, British, and German literatures from Cape Town (BA) and Tübingen (doctorate and habilitation). He has published essays on literary transcendentalism, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century aesthetics, twentieth-century literary and cultural theory, and a monograph on contemporary fiction, Casual Silences: The Poetics of Minimal Realism (Trier, 2001). His most recent study deals with nineteenth-century US literary culture and its modernist reconstruction, Cultural Authority in the Age of Whitman: A Transatlantic Perspective (Edinburgh UP, 2009). His present research interests include transatlantic romanticism and modernism, American pragmatism, transculturality, the borders between aesthetic and religious experience, and the sociology of knowledge formation.

 

Mausbach

Dr. Wilfried Mausbach

History

wmausbach@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49-6221 54 3712

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Wilfried Mausbach received his Ph.D. from the University of Cologne where he studied History, Political Science and Philosophy. He has been a reaseach fellow at the German Historical Institute in Washington, D.C., and has held assistant professorships in history at both the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies at the Free University Berlin and at Heidelberg University, where he has also been a Volkswagen Foundation fellow. His major research interests are in transnational and intercultural history with a focus on German-American relations during the twentieth century. He is the author of Zwischen Morgenthau und Marshall: Das wirtschaftspolitische Deutschlandkonzept der USA 1944-1947 (Düsseldorf: Droste, 1996), and co-editor of America, the Vietnam War, and the World. Comparative and International Perspectives (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003), and of Changing the World, Changing Oneself: Political Protest and Collective Identities in West Germany and the U.S. in the 1960s and 1970s (New York: Berghahn Books, 2010) Since 2005 he is the Executive Director of the HCA.

 

Schloss

Prof. Dr. Dietmar Schloss

Literature/Cultural Studies

dietmar.schloss@urz.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 6221 54-2834

English Department
Kettengasse 12
69117 Heidelberg

Prof. Dietmar Schloss teaches American literature and culture at the English Department of the University of Heidelberg. He holds a Ph.D. from Northwestern University (Evanston, IL.) and a postdoctoral degree (Habilitation) from the University of Heidelberg. As a Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies, he was a visiting scholar at the English and History Departments at Harvard University. He has published widely in the fields of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature and culture; his book The Virtuous Republic (2003) examines the political visions of American writers during the founding period of the United States. In 2009 he has published a volume of conference proceedings entitled Civilizing America: Manners and Civility in American Literature and Culture as well as collection of critical essays on the contemporary American novel. In his new project, entitled “Spaces of Decivilization”, he explores the phenomenon of violence in American literature and culture from the vantage point of Norbert Elias’s sociological theory.

 

Sch _ler

Dr. Anja Schüler

Academic Writing

aschueler@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49-6221 54 3879

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Anja Schüler studied History, English and Journalism at the University of Münster, the University of Georgia in Athens, and the Free University Berlin, where she earned an M.A. She was a DAAD Fellow at the Universi­ty of Minnesota in Minneapolis and lived in Washington, D.C., for several years. She received her Ph.D. from the Free University of Berlin in 2000 with a dissertation on „Women’s Movements and Social Reform: Jane Addams, Alice Salomon, and the Transatlantic Dialogue, 1889-1933.“ Her research interests include German and American Social History, Gender History, and Transatlantic History. From 2006 to 2010, Schüler taught at the University of Education in Heidelberg. At the HCA, she teaches Academic Writing and is also responsi­ble for Public Relations and the coordination of the Baden-Württemberg Seminar.

 

Stievermann

Prof. Dr. Jan Stievermann

Theology/Religious Studies

jstievermann@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 6221 54 3881

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Jan Stievermann is Professor of the History of Christianity in North America at the University of Heidelberg. He has written on a broad range of topics in the fields of American religious history and American literature, including articles for Early American Literature and William and Mary Quarterly. His book Der Sündenfall der Nachahmung: Zum Problem der Mittelbarkeit im Werk Ralph Waldo Emersons (Schöningh, 2007; The Original Fall of Imitation: The Problem of Mediacy in the Works of R.W.E.) is a comprehensive study of the co-evolution of Emerson’s religious and aesthetic thought. Together with Reiner Smolinski, he published Cotton Mather and Biblia Americana–America’s First Bible Commentary (Mohr Siebeck & Baker Academic, 2010). He is currently at work on a book, tentatively titled “The Ethnic Fantastic,” that examines issues of spirituality in contemporary ethnic minority literatures. Concurrently, he leads a DFG-funded team transcribing and editing vol. 5 of Cotton Mather’s hitherto unpublished Biblia Americana, the first comprehensive Bible commentary produced in British North America. For the Biblia-project as a whole (10 vols.) he also serves as the executive editor.

 

Thunert

PD Dr. Martin Thunert

Political Science

mthunert@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 6221 54 3877

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Martin Thunert joined the HCA as research lecturer in political science in September 2007. He is a graduate of Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University Frankfurt, holds a doctoral degree (Dr. phil) from the University of Augsburg and received his habilitation in Political Science from the University of Hamburg, where he was an assistant professor. Martin Thunert was an exchange student at the University of Glasgow, Scotland, and did graduate work at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ont. and at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. He has held appointments in political studies at several German universities and spent four years (2002-2006) as Visiting Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He was a Kennedy- Fellow at the Harvard Center for European Studies and has gained practical experience as staff assistant at the U.S. Senate (Labor, Education and Health Committee).

 

 

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